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1- Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Addiction Institute, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Mazandaran, Iran.
2- Department of Neuroscience and Addiction Studies, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3- Substance Abuse Prevention Research Center, Health Institute, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran.
4- Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.
5- Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.
6- Immunogenetics Research Center, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.
Abstract:  
It has long been known that Methamphetamine (MA), as a psychostimulant, leads to long-lasting cognitive deficits. Previous studies have shown that lithium, a mood stabilizer, could facilitate cognitive ability in most of brain diseases. The current study examine the effects of lithium on spatial memory by the Morris water maze, hippocampal apoptosis using the TUNEL assay, and brain edema in MA-exposed male Wistar rats. The findings indicated that treatment with lithium significantly ameliorated spatial learning and memory impairment in MA-treated rats. In addition, the findings showed that treatment with lithium significantly reduced brain edema and apoptosis in the CA1 neurons in MA -exposed rats. The results show that treatment with lithium can partially ameliorate the MA –induced neurocognitive deficits in rats, which may be related to its protective effect in the hippocampus.
Type of Study: Original | Subject: Behavioral Neuroscience
Received: 2021/11/13 | Accepted: 2022/05/16

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