Volume 6, Number 4 (Automn 2015 -- 2015)                   BCN 2015, 6(4): 231-238 | Back to browse issues page


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Ehsani F, Abdollahi I, Mohseni Bandpei M A, Zahiri N, Jaberzadeh S. Motor Learning and Movement Performance: Older versus Younger Adults. BCN. 2015; 6 (4) :231-238
URL: http://bcn.iums.ac.ir/article-1-575-en.html

1- PT,PhD student PhD candidate, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Lecturer, School of rehabilitation, nouromuscular Rehabilitation Research Center, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran.
2- PT,PhD PhD, PT,Assistant Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3- PT,PhD Professor, Iranian Research Centre on Aging, Department of Physiotherapy, university of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Evin, Tehran, Iran. AND Visiting Professor, University Institute of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan.
4- PT,MSc Department of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran
5- PhD Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. PO Box: 527, Frankston, VIC 3199
Abstract:  
Introduction: Motor skills play an important role during life span, and older adults need to learn or relearn these skills. The purpose of this study was to investigate how aging affects induction of improved movement performance by motor training. 
Methods: Serial Reaction Time Test (SRTT) was used to assess movement performance during 8 blocks of motor training. Participants were tested in two separate dates, 48 hours apart. First session included 8 blocks of training (blocks 1-8) and second session comprised 2 blocks (blocks 9, 10). 
Results: Analyses of data showed that reaction times in both online and offline learning were significantly shorter in older adults compared to younger adults (P<0.001). Young adults demonstrated both online and offline learning (P<0.001), but older adults only showed online learning (P<0.001) without offline learning (P=0.24). 
Discussion: The result of the current study provides evidence that the healthy older adults are able to improve their performance with practice and learn motor skill successfully in the form of online learning.
Type of Study: Original | Subject: Clinical Neuroscience
Received: 2015/01/10 | Accepted: 2015/08/18 | Published: 2015/10/1

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