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1- Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Medical Sciences and Technologies, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Neuroscience Laboratory (Brain, Cognition and Behavior), Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Medical Sciences and Technologies, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2- Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Sciences and Technologies, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
3- Department of Tissue Engineering & Applied cell Sciences, School of Advanced Medical Sciences and Technologies, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
4- Genetic Laboratory, Shiraz Fertility Center, Shiraz, Iran
5- Department of Neurosurgery, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611
Abstract:  
Introduction: Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disease with poor clinical outcomes. Animal models provide great opportunities to expand our horizons in identifying SCI pathophysiological mechanisms and subsequently introducing effective treatment strategies. The present study precisely introduces a new murine contusion model.
Methods: A simple, economical and reproducible novel instrument was designed which consists of various sections, including a body part, an immobilization piece and a bar-shaped weight. The injury was inflicted to the spinal cord using an eight-gram weight for 5, 10 or 15 minutes after laminectomy at the T9 level in male C57BL/6 mice. Motor function, cavity formation, cell injury and macrophage infiltration were evaluated 28 dayschr('39') post injury.
Results: The newly designed instrument minimized adverse spinal movement during injury induction. Moreover, no additional devices, such as a stereotaxic apparatus, was required to stabilize the animals during surgical procedure. Locomotor activity was deteriorated after injury. Furthermore, tissue damage and cell injury were exacerbated by increasing the duration of weight exertion. In addition, macrophage infiltration around the injured tissue was observed 28 days’ post injury.
Conclusion: This novel apparatus could induce a controllable SCI with a clear cavity formation in mice. No accessory elements are needed, besides the main equipment, and it can be used in future SCI studies.
Type of Study: Original | Subject: Behavioral Neuroscience
Received: 2019/10/28 | Accepted: 2020/07/12

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