Volume 3, Issue 1 (Autumn 2011 -- 2011)                   BCN 2011, 3(1): 35-43 | Back to browse issues page

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Ronaghi A, Ebrahimzadeh M, Haghparast A. Contribution of the Nucleus Cuneiformis to the Antinociceptive Effects of Systemic Morphine on Inflammatory Pain in Rats. BCN. 2011; 3 (1) :35-43
URL: http://bcn.iums.ac.ir/article-1-197-en.html
Abstract:  

Introduction: The role of midbrain reticular formation, which includes the nucleus cuneiformis (NCF), as a crucial antinociceptive region in descending pain modulation has long been investigated. In this study, we tried to highlight the role of NCF in morphine-induced antinociception in formalin-induced pain model in rats.

Methods:

A total of 201 male Wistar rats weighing 260-310 g were used in this study. The effective dose of morphine in systemic administration (intraperitoneal i.p.) was determined after a dose- and time-response protocol. In consequent groups, bilateral electrolytic lesion (500 μA, 30 sec) or reversible inactivation (lidocaine 2%) were used in the NCF before systemic administration of morphine, and then, the nociceptive test was immediately carried out.

Results:

The results showed that administration of 6 mg/kg morphine, 30 min before the formalin test, is the best dose- and time-response set in these experiments. The obtained data also indicated that bilateral electrical destruction or reversible inactivation of the NCF significantly decreased antinociceptive responses of systemic morphine (6 mg/kg i.p.) during the second phase of formalin test (P<0.05).

Discussion:

Therefore, it seems that opioid receptors located in the NCF may be involved in modulation of central sensitization which occurred in inflammatory pain in rats.

Type of Study: Original | Subject: Clinical Neuroscience
Received: 2012/03/29

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